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Personalisation in social care

Introduction

Personalisation in adult social care is about giving people choice and control to help them to live their lives in the way they would like, for as long as possible. Personalisation supports people to do what they want to do, when they want to do it. 

The extent and success of personalisation is measured with a large number of performance measures in the Adult Social Care Outcome Framework.  The measures include having a personal budget, managing the personal budget, access to information, employment and accommodation, feeling safe and an overall satisfaction measure.

The meaning of personalisation in terms of delivering services and experiences by supported people is explained in a short video on the Social Care Institute for Excellence YouTube channel:

YouTube video link

In comparison with the south east region and national figures, Bracknell Forest teams in Adult Services continue to deliver personalisation to meet the needs of local people.

Key inequalities and risk factors

  • Age – the proportion of older adults in receipt of direct payments is lower than the 18-64 age group.  However, people in the 18-64 age bracket appear to be experiencing greater levels of access to information when compared to regional and England figures
  • Gender – the proportion of males with a learning disability in employment is lower than for females, however the proportion of females with a mental health issue in employment is higher than males
  • Carer status - There is great importance in offering more support to carers of people that require social care. This has been identified as an area of weakness

Facts, figures and trends

In 2011/12, 1,010 Bracknell Forest residents aged 18 to 64 received adult social care services. The majority of these received community-based services (Health and Social Care Information Centre). Figure 1 shows the numbers of Bracknell Forest residents accessing services by service type, as a rate per 100,000 population.

Figure 1: Number of people receiving community based service in Bracknell Forest (2011/12)

Number of people recieving community based care

Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre

The following facts and figures are taken from:

Adult Social Care Survey 2012/13, 2013/14, 2014/15 and Personal Social Services Adult Social Care Survey 2015/16

Carers’ Survey 2012/13 and 2014/15

Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework 2012/13, 2013/14 and 2014/15

Control over daily life

A key objective of the drive to make care and support more personalised is that support more closely matches the needs and wishes of the individual, putting service users of services in control of their care and support.

NHS Digital data 2015/16 states that in 2015/16 the percentage of people of working age (18-69) with learning disabilities in stable and settled accommodation increased to 89.5% in 2015-16 from 88.8% in 2014-15 and 86.3% in 2012/13.  The level remains better than the regional (70.2%) and national averages (75.4%) which have also improved since the last period.

Further examination of the 2015/16 figures show that men felt more in control over their daily lives than women, as did more younger adults aged 18-64 than adults aged 65 and over:  

Choice and control over services

In 2015/16 (as in 2014/15), 100% of all people accessing long-term community support were receiving self-directed support. This is an increase on 2012/13 from 97%.

NHS Digital data 2015/16 shows Bracknell Forest outperformed the south east region and England as whole in this and the previous period.

Direct payments

Whilst all eligible people received their personal budget, the proportion managing the budget by themselves as a direct payment was lower in both 2014/15 and 2015/16 in Bracknell Forest, the south east and nationally.

Small improvements have been made across all comparators, but despite a small percentage increase locally in 2015/16 (to 25.4% from 23% in 2014/15), figures in Bracknell Forest are lower than figures for the south east and England:

Employment

Evidence and research set out in the government review "Is work good for your health and wellbeing" concluded that work was generally good for both physical and mental health and wellbeing.  Being able to work benefits individuals financially  but contribute to society gives a sense of wellbeing and helps people to reconnect to their community as a way of reducing social isolation.

People with a learning disability

Source: NHS Digital

The HSCIC data shows Bracknell Forest significantly outperformed the south east region and England as whole as well as other similar authorities (8.4%).  This represents a continuing trend and an increase on 16.3% reported in 2012/13.

People with mental health issues

In 2014/15, the proportion of working age adults (18-69) receiving secondary mental health services recorded as being employed  in Bracknell Forest was 13.3%.  This is a small increase of 0.3% on the 2012/13 figure, however the total percentage and figures for both men and women were higher than the south east and England averages, as well as the figures for other similar authorities (9.9%):

Source: NHS Digital

People with long-term conditions

The public health outcomes framework reports on the percentage point gap between the percentage of respondents in the Labour Force Survey who have a long-term condition who are classified as employed (aged 16-64) and the percentage of all respondents in the Labour Force Survey classed as employed (aged 16-64).  A small gap is preferable as is the case in Bracknell Forest:

Living where people want

Living in settled accommodation improves a person’s sense of safety and reduces the risk of social exclusion. Maintaining settled accommodation and providing social care in this environment promotes personalisation and quality of life, prevents the need to readmit people into hospital or more costly residential care and ensures a positive experience of social care.

People with a learning disability

NHS Digital data 2015/16 shows the percentage of all people of working age (18-69) with learning disabilities have stable and settled accommodation increased to 89.5% in 2015-16 from 88.8% in 2014-15 and 86.3% in 2012/13.  The level remains better than the regional (70.2%) and national averages (75.4%) which have also improved since the last period.

More females (92.6%) than males (87.9%) live independently (representing a gender gap of 4.7%) which is wider than the previous period where the gap was only 3.6% when 87.6% of men and 91.2% of women were living independently.

People with a mental health issue

NHS Digital data 2015/16 reports the the proportion of working age adults (18-69) receiving secondary mental health services living independently in Bracknell Forest was 75.3%, an increase from 74.9% in the previous period. Whilst the total figure is lower than the 83% recorded in 2012/13, the figures for Bracknell Forest figures were better than the south east and England averages.

More women than men continue to live independently. However, a gender gap appears to be emerging with more women living independently than men over the last two periods:

 

Finding information

Information is a core universal service, and a key factor in early intervention and reducing dependency. Improved and/or more information benefits people who need or use social care to have greater choice and control over their lives.

Access to information is consistent with regional and national levels regardless of demographic, although the overall figure has declined from 78.1% in 2012/13.  People aged 18-64 report slightly more issues accessing information than the south east and England averages.

Feeling safe

Safety is fundamental to the wellbeing and independence of people using social care, and the wider population. Feeling safe is a vital part of service users' experience and their care and support and it is for this reason that there are legal requirements about safety in the context of service quality, including CQC standards for registered services.

The 2014/15 figures for Bracknell Forest are generally in line with the south east and England figures regardless of age or gender.  Overall, the provision of services has made 84.1% of people feel safer which is an increase from 82% in 2012/13.  Whilst people aged 65 and over feel most safe, those in the 18 to 64 age group do not appear to experience the same benefit.  The Bracknell Forest figure also contrast with the south east and England averages.

Overall satisfaction

Figures for 2014/15 showed that 67.8% of supported people in Bracknell Forest felt satisfied with the care and support they received.  This is better than past results (64.5%, 2012-13). More male than females expressed satisfaction with services, although figures for females were in line with the south east and England figures.  Supported individuals aged 18-64 were more satisfied than older people aged 65 and over which was the trend nationally, although the younger age group had higher satisfaction than the sourth east and England averages:

Carers

Carers should be respected as equal partners in service design for those individuals for whom they care - this improves outcomes both for the cared for person and the carer, reducing the chance of breakdown in care and increasing overall satisfaction with social services.

Involvement

This measure reflects the experience of carers in how they have been consulted by both the NHS and social care.

Overall, the proportion of Bracknell Forest carers who reported in 2014/15 that they have been included or consulted in discussion about the person they care for was similar to the south east and England figures, although the figure was from from 78.8% in 2012/13.  More male caresrs felt involved than female carers, the levels for whom fell below the England average.  Older carers felt more involved than carers in the 18-64 age group.

Finding information

Improved and/or more information benefits carers by helping them to have greater choice and control over their lives and better, more informed involvement in the care of the people they look after. This may help to sustain caring relationships through, for example, reduction in stress, improved welfare and physical health improvements.

Overall satisfaction

Figures for 2014/15 from Carers Survey showed that 50.5% of carers in Bracknell Forest felt satisfied with the care and support they received.  This is similar to past results (50.3%, 2012-13). More male than female caers expressed satisfaction with services and older carers were more satisfied than carers aged 18-64.  In all instances, levels were higher than the south east and England averages:

Want to know more?

Adult Social Care Market Position Statement (Bracknell Forest Council, 2013/14) – sets out the need for a diverse, vibrant and sustainable market that offers people choice when making decisions about their care and support needs and the expectations on commissioned services and potential providers in order to meet the expressed needs of local people.

Commissioning strategy for people with a learning disability (Bracknell Forest Council and Bracknell and Ascot Clinical Commissioning Group, 2008)-  aims to improve both the lives of people with learning disabilities and the lives of their families and carers. The strategy’s 7 aims for those with learning disabilities include improving health and emotional wellbeing, improving quality of life, making a positive contribution, allowing increased choice and control, ensuring freedom from discrimination, improving economic wellbeing and maintaining personal dignity.

Healthy Minds: A Commissioning Strategy for Adults with Mental Health Needs 2013-2018 – the strategy in Bracknell Forest to achieve the objectives of the national strategy such that people will have access to services and support that will ensure good mental health, recovery from mental health problems, promote good physical health, give a positive experience of care and support, and ensure people are free from avoidable harm, stigma and discrimination.

Living with positive choices: commissioning strategy for people with long-term conditions aged 18 and over (Bracknell Forest Council, 2013) – an assessment of the needs of people with long-term conditions and a number of priorities to deliver better outcomes for people and organisations involved in providing care and support to people with long-term conditions.

Valuing people who care: Joint commissioning strategy for supporting people in an unpaid caring role (Bracknell Forest Council and Bracknell and Ascot Clinical Commissioning Group, 2015) – sets out a clear definition of carers and their role, along side a national and local picture of need and priorities for supporting people who provide unpaid care.

A number of summaries of personalisation can be found on the Community Care and the Social Care Institute for Excellence websites.

 

This page was created on 24 March 2014 and updated on 24 June 2016. Next review date July 2017.

Cite this page:

Bracknell Forest Council. (2016). JSNA – Personalisation in social care. Available at: http://jsna.bracknell-forest.gov.uk/living-working-well/healthy-lifestyl... (Accessed: dd Mmmm yyyy)

 

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