Deprivation

Introduction

Deprivation is more than just a poverty of income. Deprivation can be a lack of access to adequate education, skills and training, healthcare, housing and essential services. It may also mean exposure to higher rates of crime, a poor environment and many other negative factors.

Areas of high deprivation are associated with high unemployment, overcrowding, poor health, high premature mortality, lower life expectancy, high crime and high anti-social behaviour levels.

The index of multiple deprivation (IMD) scores an area on its level of deprivation relative to the country as a whole. The index is made up of major factors (mentioned above) which fall under several domains.

Facts, figures and trends

Bracknell Forest in terms of deprivation is ranked 292 out of 326 local authorities, where a ranking of 1 is the most deprived (based on the 2010 Indices of Multiple Deprivation). This means Bracknell Forest as an area is in the least deprived quintile nationally.

The maps below show the relative levels of deprivation compared to the country as a whole in different areas of Bracknell Forest. This is shown for the overall domain and for two sub domains of the IMD – that affect children and that affect older people. Areas of higher deprivation vary by domain, but consistently appear in and around the centre of Bracknell town centre.

Figure 1: Index of multiple deprivation - overall 2010 – LSOA

Index of deprivation map

Source: Department for Communities and Local Government

Figure 2: Income deprivation affecting children 2010 – LSOA

Income deprivation affecting children map

Source: Department for Communities and Local Government

Figure 3: Income deprivation affecting older people 2010 – LSOA

Income deprivation affecting older people map

Source: Department for Communities and Local Government

IMD is only calculated every 5 years (with the next IMD data due out in 2015). Local health profiles come out every year. The most recent Health Profile (2014) states that 11.9% (2,600) children in Bracknell Forest live in poverty.

National & local strategies (current best practices)

Nationally the ‘Fair Society Healthy Lives' report (The Marmot Review, 2010) outlines proposals for reducing inequalities in relation to health.

What are the key inequalities?

Locally inequalities in the form of deprivation exist between urban and rural areas, being worse in urban areas. An exception to this is fuel poverty, which presents less in urban areas.  

  • Bracknell Forest ProfileThis section contains the Bracknell Forest ward profiles and demographics.You are here
  • Starting WellThis section contains information on maternity and ages 0-4 years.You are here
  • Developing WellThis section contains information on young people's health and wellbeing.You are here
  • Living & Working WellThis section contains information on adult health conditions and lifestyle choices.You are here
  • Ageing WellThis section contains information on older people's health and wellbeing.You are here
  • People & PlacesThis section contains information on the wider determinants of health.You are here